Posted by: Johnold Strey | February 3, 2011

NPH Products on Logos Pre-Pub

More and more of my personal and pastoral study is done with Logos Bible Software.  I attended “Camp Logos I” a little over a year ago here in the Bay Area, and just a few weeks ago I went to “Camp Logos II” when it was held in the greater Sacramento area.  Each two-day seminar was well worth the time and expense: I always knew that Logos Bible Software was a useful tool, but it certainly helps to have someone teach you how to use it to its fullest, and that’s what the two seminars did.  As a result, I use Logos for my daily devotions, reading through the Lutheran Confessions, research, sermon and Bible study preparation, and teaching various Bible classes.

Many of the books I have in Logos format (beyond lexicons and grammars, which tend to be “neutral” by their very nature) come from a conservative Christian or Protestant viewpoint.  These books have come with my “base package” or with other bundles of books that I’ve purchased over the last several years.  From a confessional Lutheran perspective, these types of resources are valuable because they share the same view of biblical inspiration and inerrancy that I have: they take the Word of God seriously — and that’s good!  However, a confessional Lutheran can’t help but notice a greater emphasis on law instead of gospel and a different understanding the Means of Grace, the gospel in Word and Sacraments — and that’s not so good!  For example, after I just finished the long process of “tagging” (i.e. putting books into my own categories or labels) the 1,365 books currently in my Logos library, I couldn’t help but notice how many books ended up in the “Christian Life” category, but by comparison, very few were given tags like “Christology,” “Holy Baptism,” or “Holy Communion.”

That’s why it is important for confessional Lutherans to build up their Lutheran resources in Logos.  Concordia Publishing House (the publishing company of the Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod) has a rather extensive library of books that work with Libronix (the name of the old Logos “engine”) and Logos — everything from Luther’s Works, to the new Concordia Commentary, to the Lutheran Confessions, to many standard Lutheran theological works.  Northwestern Publishing House (the publishing company of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod) has done the same.  Their popular People’s Bible commentary series, Franzmann’s Bible History Commentary, the Triglotta (three-language) version of the Lutheran Confessions, and four decades’ worth of issues of the Wisconsin Lutheran Quarterly are all available in Logos format.  In Logos form, theses resource take on new dimensions as both reading and research tools.

Four popular WELS resources recently appeared on the “Pre-Publication” page of the Logos website.  Pre-Publications are resources that will be produced if enough people commit to purchasing it in advance.  The advanced commitments from customers assure Logos that it will be worth their energy to produce a product, and the customers who make the advanced commitment receive a discounted price.  Confessional Lutherans in general and WELS pastors in particular will likely want to check out these newly posted resources on the Logos Pre-Pub page.  The descriptions below are copied directly from the Logos website, and the links will take you to the products on the Logos website. 

Commentary on Song of Songs by John F. Brug

The Song of Songs is one of the most challenging books in the Bible. The Song is filled with so many rare Hebrew words that it is sometimes hard to make sense of the sentences, but the book of Job has even more rare words and hapax legomena. There is considerable difference of opinion about the outline and the divisions of the Song, but it is equally hard to connect the verses in Proverbs or the chapters in Psalms. There is, however, no other book for which there is such basic disagreement about the theme and topic of the book as there is for the Song of Songs. What is the book about? Is it primarily about the love of woman and man, or is it about the love of God and his people? The Song is so difficult, on so many levels, that it has been compared to a lock for which the key has been lost.

John F. Brug’s Commentary on Song of Songs is a solid, well-researched, and practical commentary based on the Hebrew text. Brug approaches Song of Songs with a literal and an allegorical interpretation—in its interpretation of the text this commentary presents the insights and applications of both of these approaches to the Song. In each section it begins with a literal interpretation of the text, followed by the application of its statements both to male-female love and divine-human love. In order to grasp the depth of this wonderful book of the Bible, Brug convinces that both approaches are needed: “The Song originated not in a pagan society, but among God’s people. More specifically, it was given to them by the God who is love. As we study this Song we will ponder the mystery and beauty of love between man and woman, but our sight will also rise above this to the love of God and His people.” This is a concise commentary that you will refer to time and time again.

The entire Hebrew text of the Song is included with the author’s own translation, and with the Logos Bible Software edition all Scripture passages in John F. Brug’s Commentary on Song of Songs are tagged and appear on mouse-over. What’s more, Scripture references are linked to the Hebrew texts and to the wealth of language resources in your digital library. This makes these resources more powerful and easier to access than ever before for scholarly work or personal Bible study. With the advanced search features of Logos Bible Software, you can perform powerful searches by topic or Scripture reference—finding, for example, every mention of “love,” or “marriage.”

Ministers of Christ: 2 Corinthians by John P. Meyer

Professor John P. Meyer’s commentary on Paul’s second letter to the Corinthians, Ministers of Christ, was first published in 1963 as part of the centennial celebration observance of Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary, where Meyer taught for 44 years. Almost fifty years later, another professor of Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary and student of Meyer, Armin J. Panning, was asked to update the commentary by incorporating the New International Version of the Bible where appropriate. However, Meyer’s own literal translation of the text of 2 Corinthians has been retained, and this classic commentary continues to influence another generation of pastors and seminary students.

In this commentary on Paul’s second letter to the Corinthians, we have not only an exposition of the great thoughts and words of the divinely inspired writer, but particularly a study of the emotional overtones attending these words, and in great detail a delineation of the concrete situations out of which this writing grew and toward which it was directed. What thoughts Paul intended his words to convey and why he framed them as he did; how his words were received at Corinth and what sort of effect they wrought—these are the matters that receive primary consideration in this reliable and thoughtful commentary.

This commentary provides a clear, thorough study of Paul’s words, and with the Logos Bible Software editions all Scripture passages in Ministers of Christ, are tagged and appear on mouse-over. What’s more, Scripture references are linked to the Greek texts and to the wealth of language resources in your digital library. This makes these resources more powerful and easier to access than ever before for scholarly work or personal Bible study. With the advanced search features of Logos Bible Software, you can perform powerful searches by topic or Scripture reference—finding, for example, every mention of “temple,” or “communion.”

A Commentary on Galatians and Paul’s Rhapsody in Christ: A Commentary on Ephesians by John P. Koehler

Professor John Philip Koehler believed that the study of the Holy Scriptures is the very heart of all theological studies. Exegesis was for him the regina (the queen) of all the theological disciplines. The text of the Scriptures, he maintained, must be understood by the theologian in its grammatical and historical context without allowing other considerations to weaken its import. For that reason Professor Koehler always strove to understand the author from his position at the time of writing (the times in which he and his readers lived, their backgrounds, mental makeup, etc.) and to observe how the Holy Spirit used all of this to express the gospel. For him the Scriptures were the Word of God in which God, through human language, speaks His law and His gospel in a message which can be rightly understood only by faith in Him who is the very center of the Scriptures, our Lord Jesus Christ.

Logos is excited to present two commentaries from Professor John Philip Koehler: A Commentary on Galatians and Paul’s Rhapsody in Christ: A Commentary on Ephesians. These expositions were originally prepared by Professor Koehler for his students at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary with the express purpose of guiding them through the main line of thought in the epistles. Thus time could be gained for philological, exegetical, and theological studies in the classroom. At the same time, however, the author wanted to make his exposition available to the general reader interested in more advanced Bible study.

These commentaries provide a clear, thorough study of Paul’s words, and with the Logos Bible Software editions all Scripture passages in A Commentary on Galatians and Paul’s Rhapsody in Christ: A Commentary on Ephesians. are tagged and appear on mouse-over. What’s more, Scripture references are linked to the Greek texts and to the wealth of language resources in your digital library. This makes these resources more powerful and easier to access than ever before for scholarly work or personal Bible study. With the advanced search features of Logos Bible Software, you can perform powerful searches by topic or Scripture reference—finding, for example, every mention of “grace,” or “servant.”

Wisconsin Lutheran Quarterly from 1990 to 2010 (84 issues)

Since 1904 the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod has published a theological journal, originally called Theologische Quartalschrift, now the Wisconsin Lutheran Quarterly. This journal is issued by Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary as a testimony of its theological convictions, as a public witness to the saving truths of Holy Scripture, and in the interest of the theological and professional growth of those whom the seminary is training for the public ministry and of those already active in this ministry.

With the Logos Bible Software edition all Scripture passages in Wisconsin Lutheran Quarterly are tagged and appear on mouse-over. What’s more, Scripture references are linked to the wealth of language resources in your digital library. This makes all 84 issues more powerful and easier to access than ever before for scholarly work or personal Bible study. With the advanced search features of Logos Bible Software, you can perform powerful searches by topic or Scripture reference—finding, for example, every mention of “justification,” or “Paul.”

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Responses

  1. Peace to you! And! Joy in the Lord!

    Thanks for the word on the pre-pubs. Have now subscribed to all of them!

    🙂


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